105 Comments Posted by Eric

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Thanks everyone
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Great shot. We can only wonder, Anna.
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I did an image search for "embalming table" and it wasn't all that work friendly so pulled the eject handle as I'm in a fairly new job. (they might forgive looking at abandoned site photos, but yeah- corpses not so much probably) Good question.
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The inevitable graffiti, so irreverent and appalling, and yet it's somehow part of the tapestry. As a teen in the 80's I used to wander a sanatorium abandoned since the 60's, and even as a teen I was disturbed by the graffiti, but much less so. As we age (I'm now in my mid 40's) I think we cultivate a real appreciation for the aesthetics of the effects associated with the passage of time- not just decay but anything that contributes to the narrative. The more recent the effect, generally, the least revered, or most reviled- and yet if we could see a bigger picture- that same same graffiti say in another 60 years it would have earned some reverence. We're appalled by the ignorant irreverence of the young, living in their "NOW" so blind to history and so quick to deface. It's fascinating.
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Binky I was thinking the same thing, picturing elderly patients smoking away- and then the irony of it having begun as a TB clinic for kids.
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Great image, the inspiration for who knows how many games and set designs. Truly awesome.
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I have seen massive amounts of small crosses used to depict the number of unborn at anti abortion displays. there could have been one held here at sometime.
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Wow I was looking for this place on the internet and found this. I was one of the boys who helped clean things up in there before the demo and I was knee high inside the diaper room, lol. We bagged and hauled them all out to the incinerator, being they were probably not suitable for use as they had been there a long time and infested with mice, rats, coons, everything. My buddy suggested the hospital had children too at times and the diapers were used for bed wetting ect ect. Obviously they didn't have to use them a lot. And yes we found adult diapers too. Funny and cool to see this here, Eric.
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Decades ago, in the sixth grade of a public school in western Massachusetts, we had a teacher who used to say, "I'm going to have you sent to Northampton," when we misbehaved..

"What's Northampton?" someone would ask, and some wiseguy would answer by pointing at his ear with his index finger in a spiraling corkscrew gesture.

Years later I lived near Green Street, where I'd walk to the end, watch the women play softball on the fields below, and gaze across the valley at the hospital on top of the hill. It was a disconcerting scene. I had no idea the complex was so huge.
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This building was the butcher shop and food stock loading dock. I was there yesterday and spoke to a guy that worked there in that building untill 1995 his name was Gillis.
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I viste this site often. When I was young I had the whooping cough and was kept in a crib just like this. The thing I find most aobut this site is the detail in the pictures. I veiw it more as art and I am glad to say it brings back no bad memories.
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lol why are all the houses like blue?
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It gives me vertigo!
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Superb.
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My grandfather was a dentist here. He said that the children had terrible teeth. Many dentists would tell the children, "this won't hurt," but it did hurt, so they mistrusted the dentist and refused further treatment. So he was honest with the children and was able to help them. He took me on a tour of the state school at Taunton when I was in high school in the 60s. Many sad cases with hydrocephalus and devastating deformities, and many affectionate children with Down's Syndrome.