302 Comments for Barlow State Hospital

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Nice photo. Too bad Lynn isn't around to explain things to us.
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With a son who has a rare neuromuscular disease this is a custom wheelchair for a specific kid that was used in the past decade. Yes there are kiddos that don't have chairs and need them. Sad to see this just rotting.
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flushed, it sounds like you had a horrible time. I for one would be interested in your story should you care to put pen to paper.
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Motts how do you come up with these name on the pictures!!
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For those wanting to look at more mental institution stuff, there is a site titled Galleries and the pictures are taken by Jon Crispin. He has been given access to suitcases that people brought when they checked into a mental hospital. The cases are all that is left of the patients. The items have been preserved and they are maintained by the New York State Museum. It is interesting to see the contents. Hope you don't mind my giving this information Mr Motts. Please delete if you don't want it posted here.
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So just for the heck of it I googled this model. It is still available and the new price is $4900.00. I found a used one on a site named PEMED for $1475.00. Just storing that is a waste of money, again.
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Flushed, my nurses empathy is enraged at what was done to you. Your postings are always so professional sounding. I am amazed that after the mistreatment you received that you do not sound bitter. I am sorry for what was done to you. I wish there had been a nurse to stand up for you. Thanks for giving us a look at the atrocities you suffered. It can't be easy to talk about.
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Maybe the windows were also for observation of the patient.
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I would have sat down and started reading and probably have gotten caught. Old records are so interesting to read. The names of diseases were different and the diagnosis were sometimes strange, but deep down people are people with the same problems. These should be secured and preserved for future generations. Being over 100 years old it is probably safe to assume the patients are all deceased.
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Since Mr Motts commented that it looked like that last use of the building maybe the majority of the kids are still alive. This areas seems to have been kept so the file drawers can be opened. The job of looking for something would be thankless, but sometimes it is important to see all of a patient's history. Can you imagine trying to figure out who is dead and who is alive? Yikes
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Sandy, I worked with a nurse who had terrible plantar fascitis She sat with an ice pack under her foot when she was charting and tried all kinds of braces. Turned out her nursing shoes were 8 years old and no longer were providing the support the foot needed. Check your shoes. Maybe you are rotating an old pair in that flares the pain up every time you wear them.
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I have almost that same cabinet in my basement. Hubby uses it for tools. The drawers get larger (depth) as they closer to the floor. Flushed you have described it exactly right.
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FYI My husband serviced and installed dental equip for 40 years. He said this chair may be as old as 40 years. The main problem with this type of chair is that the parts are no longer available to rebuild the motor that is under the chair. He has not worked since 2012 and says that even before that the most these went for was about $1500.00. It all depends on the motor.
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I think these chairs are made for the individual user. But this one looks like it could be taken apart and the parts used to build other custom chairs. Such a shame to see this going to waste. I'm with you Jen.
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These carts are actually pretty old. The hospital I worked in phased them out before 2001. I seem to remember that in the old days 1970's the carts were grounded with a chain that dangled under them. I think the fact that a patient might need to be defibrillated while on this cart has led to some of the design. The second cart from the left has a brake on the right side tire. The cart on the far right has the small wheels and no sign of a brake. Of course it is lower and has full side rails which may indicate it was for a child. These carts probably would not pass inspection by a group inspecting hospitals. Joint commission comes to mind.