1,618 Comments for Eagle River Power Station

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this is an awesome picture
Small generators. Used to work on home generators back in the day and that's exactly what they looked like.
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frequency meter indicated the hz out put, generators have to be run up to speed and synchronised with the grid nominal 60hz
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hv switch gear uses battery operated trip and closing coils usually 110v
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look like signal generators for zellwegger
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That 'trapdoor' by his left foot is how someone would go down behind the clock that you photographed, to reset it. But when it was time to put the clock ahead or back, we would sometimes get a new guy to go ask the shift superintendent for a safety harness and lanyard, telling him we would have to hang him down from the overhead crane hook to move the hour hand.
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You're looking at the World's largest single shaft turbine generator in 1941. And it ran continuously throughout WW2.
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I like the idea of you not using the real name of this place. I worked at 'Eagle River' Generating Station from 1968 to 1985, when it was retired. Great photos. You've shown equipment and locations at the station that I haven't seen before on the internet. Be safe.
Probably one of the coal pulverizers or coal mills that grind up the coal to powder consistency to be fed to the boiler to produce steam. Could be a Ball mill or a Bowl mill. I'm more familiar with the Bowl type mills and the Atrita or impingement mills.
I'd say that they are a couple of small forced draft fans that would feed primary air for combustion of the pulverized coal in the boiler furnace.
I'm with some of you guys that said they are old "freq changers" or MG sets. A lot of these older power plants had 25HZ power to run the older equipment and when they upgraded or added newer equipment in them they needed these MG sets or "Frequency changers" to run their older equipment that was still running that used 25 HZ power instead of 60HZ power.
Shawn is right. It's probably the steam jet air ejector condenser for the steam air ejectors that would help to draw a vacuum on the condensers that are under the turbines on the generating floor of the power plant. Condensers are indirect contact heat exchangers used here.
Gratefulzenz is right Scooter. Sorry, but you are way off scooter.
I'd venture a guess at what Joe said, it's a circ water pump for the cooling water for the condenser. The name plate on the base says: C.F. Wheeler Mfg. Co. Phila. Pa.
These are the steam coils in the forced draft fans ducting that would have been used to preheat the air going to the boiler burners for better combustion of the pulverized coal. The steam coils were mainly used during cooler or cold weather to preheat the air from the forced draft blower fans.