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The workmanship on that hydronic heating system plumbing is really nice.
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So glad you documented this photographically and provided some written annotations.
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I was a prisoner here in 1992 and that very pretty building used to house hundreds of convicts. The screened in porches on either end of the building was where we could sit outside after lockdown. Seeing this photo brought chills to my soul. I still remember the haunted nights inside that building and the things both long term guards and inmates would tell of seeing in its walls...... Glad that part of my life is long behind me though the memories of 2 years there will stay with me forever. Extremely haunted.
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I would start by contacting the state's mental health or human services departments to locate these records.
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I'm not sure; you might want to try to contact the developers of the site: http://www.villagesatstaunton.com/
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How does one go about locating a grave? My great-great uncle died here. He fought with Jackson until he lost an eye. He died at Western State in 1889. I would love to have a stone placed for him.
Is this open to public?
Or a photography group?
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Anyone know if this place is still abandoned?
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Old places like this altho no longer in use by us, may however, still be in use by those who died here. I urge you to watch the movie ROSE RED. Based on fiction from the novel and by the mind of Stephen King.
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Lightshot's version of Print screen works just fine. Get your copy here: http://prnt.sc/ I think I'll run the photo thru my editing software and change the colors a bit, maybe give it some additional tilt and see how much more beautiful I can make it. Thanks for posting this.
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I agree that this would be an ideal plan to re-purpose the facility, and I have seen this happen in Europe, but in this country the dollar is king. I would imagine the cost to rehab these old buildings up to code and maintain them far exceeds any kind of mental health funding that currently exists... it seems to be hard enough to keep the current facilities open, let alone restore these structures and educate the public (who I believe would prefer keeping their knowledge at the ignorant horror movie level, but I digress).

Sadly, I think the best we can hope for is some kind of re-purposing of these buildings in any kind of way (usually they just get bulldozed and dumped in a landfill), and maybe there would be some kind of plaque installed to tell its tale.
I am reading The Madman's Tale by John Katzenbach; terrors of which has led me to investigate W S Hospital and it's history. I am horrified that developers have purchased this building for refurbishment into luxury flats when it's history is steeped in despair, agony and mistreatment of thousands of poor souls who were incarcerated. Who, with a conscience, would wish to live in a property which has been the site of such suffering and cruelty? Refurbishment will not erase it's horrific history; this remains as witness within it's very foundations. It should have been divided into a museum of remembrance and a charity events fundraising venue for mental health awareness, research and development for advanced treatments therein.
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Get me a red shirt!
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You had a view of the Dejarnette Sanatarium ( http://opacity.us/site...nette_sanitarium.htm ), which was last used to treat adolescents with behavioral disorders, and is awaiting demolition. The state hospital is located just up the street, just before you enter downtown.
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Wondering where this place is. My husband and I stayed at the Quality Inn which had a view of a building that looked abandoned. The motel personnel said it had been a mental institution but it certainly didn't look like it had been restored or made into condominiums. Anyone know? Very curious.