Comments Posted by rich

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Welcome to where time stands still, no one leaves and no one will..."
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This site is truly inspiring. Really hooked.
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I was at kppc last night, I dont think it is haunted but I guess that is something you should find out for yourself. Dont go inside though. SHITLOADS of cops, asbestos, rat crap, a few homeless people, alarms (yes inside also) and a decaying support beams. Be safe.
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I've been to the old sanitorium in Kazoo a dozen times (not in a couple years though). Real creepy, but never seen anything to suggest its haunted. The morgue is freaky, especially if you get in the those body drawer things and close the door. Used to sit on the roof and drink beers, and came across a bum up there once. Thats about the scariest thing I've seen there.
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I remember that view. We followed Bill Monroe on that stage in 1988. It really did look grand back then, in a way only possible in the Catskills. Our mandolin player backstage was impressed that Shecky Greene probably used the same mirror he did to get ready.
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Played a winter bluegrass festival there in 1988 - one of the promoter's big selling points was "you never have to go outside". These hallways took care of that.
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as a teenager i would go on this ride to smoke
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Hey Chris would you call me at 785-650-3800. I would like to talk to you about the green thing that goes with this machine. Thanks.
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Right. This is a regular bathtub. In the late 60's there was a hydrotherapy room at Danvers with canvas covers on the tubs that were used to contain the patients in an ice bath or hot water. However, to my knowledge, no hydrotherapy was used when I worked there. 1968-71
I loved picking the brains of old time employees who were working there at the time.
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Ward "A" had 3 levels. A-3 was the "violent ward." In the late 60's when i worked ayt Danvers, the A wards were male admission wards. I worked on A-2 ans A-3. I was also told I was the first full time male employee of A-3.
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THE CEMETARY IS ON CALL HOLLOW ROAD.
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Notice above the casket. Above the middle stone, it looks like a face. You can see the nose, lips, and eyes.
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I was the Head Physical Therapist from 1994-1996. When I first started in 1993 they were still using this with a fwe patients who had pressure sores and ulcers. I was working there in the winter of 1996 when the "Clinic" building was flooded. It occured shortly after the blizzard of 1996 in early January. The 26" of snow that shut down NYC for a day evenutally melted and rand down the hill off the Palisades and flooded the basement of this building rendering it completely useless. At the time is was the main building on campus. It was the medical clinic for Dental, outside MD's that treated LVDC clients, Physical Therapy and it also housed some of the LVDC Administrators.

It was the beginning of the end for LVDC's campus. This picture brings back a lot of memories. I only worked at LVDC for 3 years (had a scholarship from NYS and chose to work with Developementally Disabled individuals....ended up at LVDC.)

I just happened to google LVDC, just to see if there was anything on the web...and got to your site. The pictures are very eerie. I spent three long years there.
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This building could serve as a museum , office and event venue that could serve as a means of introducing mental health issues and the State Hospital to the general public, i.e., public relations. Instead, it will be allowed to fall down and be forgotten.
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I assume the calcium deposits in subterranean places comes from water leaching calcium out of stone and soil as it filters through those layers, but I wouldn't think building materials would have much calcium in them for the water to draw out. There's obviously *something* there for the water to absorb, though.