Comments

There are about 2500 graves there. Even though time has worn off the register numbers the hospital personnel do know who is buried there and where. These people are not forgotten. The shed to the left was the K-9 kennel when it was a prison.
wrote:
That may be true, Mike, but there are many people who collect old movie and film equipment. To someone who collects such things, such a find could have plenty of value.
Indeed, yes i do, Iceberg, i love it - but am all flabbergasted, quiet and wide-eyed as this facade event is so difficult to understand; all fixed up dear -
and behind it crumbling, tumbling down, rotting, juicy lush wild wines thriving growing galore - weirdest happening ever! Cool gallery.
Goodness what a lovely old-school ticket window - that little round opening is just adorable. Well built - handrail still there.
Neat doors - studded cream. Soft. The olive + the burgundy comes inside neatly and well. Good.
Ohhhh how wonderful a new gallery, thanks - ocher, cerulean, burgundy and olive a most attractive combination of colors to m, The RITZ shades.
you have to share this location!! :) I have some good ones too! :)))
wrote:
A sign should have been made for the building- "No decaying, crumbling, peeling, debris collecting, etc."
wrote:
HENRY LONGFELLOW SCHOOL
wrote:
More creepy hospitals are great, but I love the old theatres! Thanks as always.
wrote:
Interesting they didn't use the original holes for the replacement neon.

As to why the place likely went under, it's all but impossible for a single screen theatre to survive these days. Actually, it was almost impossible even 30 years ago when so many were closing. It's hard to get film. The investment for modern projection/sound is high (even the move from carbon to xenon lamps which didn't happen here and forget about the move to digital).
You also saw a lot of cases where the owners got old and retired/passed and there was no one who wanted to take it over. It was a lot of work and after the 50's - 60's it wasn't easy to even break even. You saw a lot of older couples running local theatres as their retirement hobby...
wrote:
I've always liked walls like that. Nice shot.
wrote:
Maybe they are showing "The Condemned" with Steve Austin. One please!
wrote:
The cardboard must have been put there after it closed or when some final maintenance (like oiling) was done. Cardboard there when the lamp is running would have been burned within seconds.
wrote:
I know we all hate to see this kind of equipment rotting away. While old theatre seats and similar customer facing items have value, old projection equipment is essentially worthless. There isn't a single item here that would be of any use to a modern (or even less than modern) theatre. Most of that equipment is so heavy it isn't even worth hauling out for scrap prices.